• Francophone Quebecers in Canada’s Odyssey: Pillar or Passengers?

    Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the second in a three-part series assessing the book’s significance. Donald Fyson My comments focus on the pre-Confederation chapters of Peter Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey. I’ll concentrate on Quebec and… Continue Reading

  • An Odyssey or a Contract: Conquests, Cessions, Constitutions and History

    Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the first in a three-part series assessing the book’s significance. Elizabeth Mancke Upon first inspection of Canada’s Odyssey: A Country Based on Incomplete Conquests, I recoiled. The main title… Continue Reading

  • Hope and Despair in the Meghalayan Age

    Gregory Kennedy Note: This is the fourth in a series on environmental history and early modern history cross-posted with  NiCHE, the Network in Canadian History & Environment. Life as an academic often feels like constant movement between hope and despair. Hope that our research will have an impact, and be accepted our peers … despair at the latest… Continue Reading

  • Continuing the Journey: Where Borealia is headed

    Keith Grant Next week at Borealia we begin our fourth year of blogging about the vibrant scholarship being done on the histories of northern North America. We remain enthusiastic about our goal of hosting engaging conversations for both academic and public readerships. Regular readers will no doubt have noticed that things have been a bit more… Continue Reading

  • What Peter Fidler Didn’t Report

    George Colpitts Note: This is the third in a series on environmental history and early modern history cross-posted with  NiCHE, the Network in Canadian History & Environment. Peter Fidler was going where few Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) traders had gone in the summer of 1800: the South Branch territories of present-day southern Saskatchewan and Alberta. He was to… Continue Reading

  • We Will All Be Early Moderns

    Anya Zilberstein Note: This is the second in a series on environmental history and early modern history cross-posted with  NiCHE, the Network in Canadian History & Environment. Environmental historians of the 20th and 21st centuries should be early modernists. That’s because, just like present and presentism, the non-specialist definition of modern (not to say modernity, modernism, and their posterior… Continue Reading