• What Peter Fidler Didn’t Report

    George Colpitts Peter Fidler was going where few Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) traders had gone in the summer of 1800: the South Branch territories of present-day southern Saskatchewan and Alberta. He was to build Chesterfield House at the junction of the South Saskatchewan and Red Deer Rivers, deep in the drier, xeric grasslands of the… Continue Reading

  • Teaching the Politics and Meaning of Maps

    Claire Campbell   I like maps. A lot. I used to study the Rand McNally Road Atlas on long car trips. Sometimes when I’m homesick I’ll meander through Halifax on Google Streetview. And this year I’m team-teaching a new course on “The Politics and Meaning of Maps.” The Premise This is an Integrated Perspectives course,… Continue Reading

  • Anguish in the Loyalist Archives, Part 2

    Editor’s note: This is the second of two essays on working with online databases to research loyalist history in Upper Canada. They originally appeared in the Autumn of 2016 in a slightly different form as part of a longer series at the group history blog, Isles Abroad. You can find all their posts about loyalists… Continue Reading

  • Anguish in the Loyalist Archives, Part 1

    Paula Dumas Editor’s note: This is the first of two essays on working with online databases to research Loyalist history in Upper Canada. They originally appeared in the Autumn of 2016 in a slightly different form as part of a longer series at the group history blog, Isles Abroad. You can find all their posts… Continue Reading

  • A Conversation about Teaching Early Canadian History in the United States, Part 2: In the Classroom

    This is the second of a three-part conversation between historians Claire Campbell, Alexandre Dubé, Jeffers Lennox, and Christopher Parsons, on being “early Canadianists” in the United States. You can find the rest of the series here. Borealia: What do your U.S. students know about early Canada? How do you think that compares with what Canadian students… Continue Reading

  • Skills for Historians of the Future: Palaeography

    Leah Grandy Future historians are facing a crisis in a skill set that has not been a significant issue in the past. As the teaching of cursive writing has been eliminated or greatly diminished from North American elementary school curriculums, we are seeing the arrival of university students to arts programmes unable to read written… Continue Reading